The New Testament – A Comprehensive Summary

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 

– John 1:1

Understanding the Names, Numbers, Authors and Titles of the New Testament

The 27 Books of the New Testament
1) Matthew, 2) Mark, 3) Luke, 4) John, 5) Acts, 6) Romans, 7) 1 Corinthians, 8) 2 Corinthians, 9) Galatians, 10) Ephesians, 11) Philippians, 12) Colossians, 13) 1 Thessalonians, 14) 2 Thessalonians, 15) 1 Timothy, 16) 2 Timothy, 17) Titus, 18) Philemon, 19) Hebrews, 20) James, 21) 1 Peter, 22) 2 Peter, 23) 1 John, 24) 2 John, 25) 3 John, 26) Jude,  27) Revelation

The 3 Main Authors of the New Testament
I. John: (2 Books and 3 Letters) Gospel of John, 1st Letter of John, 2nd Letter of John, 3rd Letter of John, Book of Revelation
II. Paul: (13 Letters) Letter to the Romans, 1st Letter to the Corinthians, 2nd Letter to the Corinthians, Letter to the Galatians, Letter to the Ephesians, Letter to the Philippians, Letter to the Colossians, 1st Letter to the Thessalonians, 2nd Letter to the Thessalonians, 1st Letter to Timothy, 2nd Letter to Timothy, Letter to Titus, Letter to Philemon
III. Luke: (2 Books) Gospel of Luke, Book of Acts

The Basic Facts of the New Testament
– The New Testament has been a collection of exactly 27 different documents since the very beginning of Christianity. 2,000 years later, every form of Christianity still uses the same 27 books as the official Canon of their religious faith.
– The New Testament, including every single version of the Christian Bible ever written, consists of the following 27 different books: 1) Matthew, 2) Mark, 3) Luke, 4) John, 5) Acts, 6) Romans, 7) 1 Corinthians, 8) 2 Corinthians, 9) Galatians, 10) Ephesians, 11) Philippians, 12) Colossians, 13) 1 Thessalonians, 14) 2 Thessalonians, 15) 1 Timothy, 16) 2 Timothy, 17) Titus, 18) Philemon, 19) Hebrews, 20) James, 21) 1 Peter, 22) 2 Peter, 23) 1 John, 24) 2 John, 25) 3 John, 26) Jude,  27) Revelation.
– The New Testament was completely written by 8 known individuals over a 45 year period of time (~ 45-90 A.D.). Their names are as follows: 1) Matthew, 2) Mark, 3) Luke, 4) John, 5) Paul 6) James, 7) Peter, 8) Jude, 9) ????
– The individual who wrote the Letter to the Hebrews would be counted as the 9th author of the New Testament, yet his identity continues to remain unknown even today, nearly 2,000 years later.
– The New Testament has exactly 4 Gospels, 2 Books, and 21 Letters.
– The 4 New Testament Gospels include the Gospel of Matthew, Gospel of Mark, Gospel of Luke, and the Gospel of John.
– The 2 New Testament Books are commonly known as the Book of Acts, and the Book of Revelation.
– The 21 New Testament Letters, as they written in the New Testament, include the Letter to the Romans, 1st Letter to the Corinthians, 2nd Letter to the Corinthians, Letter to the Galatians, Letter to the Ephesians, Letter to the Philippians, Letter to the Colossians, 1st Letter to the Thessalonians, 2nd Letter to the Thessalonians, 1st Letter to Timothy, 2nd Letter toTimothy, Letter toTitus, Letter to Philemon, Letter to the Hebrews, Letter of James, 1st Letter of Peter, 2nd Letter of Peter, 1st Letter of John, 2nd Letter of John, 3rd Letter of John, and the Letter to Jude.

Vital Statistics of the New Testament
Total Books: 27
Total Chapters: 260
Total Verses: ~7,957
Total Words: ~180,552
Total Letters: ~838,380
Middle Book: 2 Thessalonians
Middle Chapter: Romans 8, 9
Middle Verse: Acts 27:17
Smallest Book: 3 John
Largest Book: Luke
Shortest Verse: John 11:35
Longest Verse: Revelation 20:4
Longest Chapter: Luke 1

The 8 New Testament Authors and Saints
– The 8 New Testament authors and their respective contributions (27 Books) include St. Matthew (Gospel of Matthew), St. Mark (Gospel of Mark), St. Luke (Gospel of Luke, Book of Acts), St. John (Gospel of John, 1st Letter of John, 2nd Letter of John, 3rd Letter of John, Book of Revelation), St. James (Letter of James), St. Peter (1st Letter of Peter, 2nd Letter of Peter), St. Jude (Letter of Jude), and St. Paul (Letter to the Romans, 1st Letter to the Corinthians, 2nd Letter to the Corinthians, Letter to the Galatians, Letter to the Ephesians, Letter to the Philippians, Letter to the Colossians, 1st Letter to the Thessalonians, 2nd Letter to the Thessalonians, 1st Letter to Timothy, 2nd Letter to Timothy, Letter to Titus, Letter to Philemon)
– The 2 New Testament Letters attributed to St. Peter are traditionally referred to as the Petrine Epistles
– The 3 New Testament Letters attributed to St. John are traditionally referred to as the Johanine Epistles
– The 13 New Testament Letters attributed to St. Paul are traditionally referred to as the Pauline Epistles
– Some of the traditional names given to the New Testament authors include the following: Matthew the tax collector (Matthew), John-Mark (Mark), Luke the Physician (Luke), John the Disciple that Jesus loved (John), Paul (Saul) of Tarsus (Paul), Peter of the Twelve (Peter), James, the brother of Jesus (James), Jude, the brother of James (Jude)

XXVII. – XXVII. – XXVII. – XXVII. – XXVII. – XXVII. – XXVII. – XXVII. –

A Basic Time-Line of the New Testament

45 A.D. – James writes the Letter of James
50 A.D. – Mark writes the Gospel of Mark
50 A.D. – Paul begins to write 13 Letters including the Letter to the Romans, 1st Letter to the Corinthians, 2nd Letter to the  Corinthians, Letter to the Galatians, Letter to the Ephesians, Letter to the Philippians, Letter to the Colossians, 1st Letter to the Thessalonians, 2nd Letter to the Thessalonians, 1st Letter to Timothy, 2nd Letter to Timothy, Letter to Titus, Letter to Philemon
55 A.D. – Matthew writes the Gospel of Matthew
60 A.D. – Luke writes the Gospel of Luke
60 A.D. – Peter writes the 1st Letter of Peter, 2nd Letter of Peter
60 A.D. – Jude writes the Letter of Jude
65 A.D. – Luke writes the Book of Acts
65 A.D. – An Unknown Author writes the Letter to the Hebrews
70 A.D. – Paul finishes writing the last of his 13 letters
90 A.D. – John writes the Gospel of John
90 A.D. – John wrote the 1st Letter of John, 2nd Letter of John, 3rd Letter of John
90 A.D. – John writes the Book of Revelation

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The Formal Titles of the 27 New Testament Books
1) The Gospel According to Matthew, 2) The Gospel According to Mark, 3) The Gospel According to Luke, 4) The Gospel According to John, 5) The Book of Acts, 6) The Letter to the Romans, 7) The 1st Letter to the Corinthians, 8) The 2nd Letter to the Corinthians, 9) The Letter to the Galatians, 10) The Letter to the Ephesians, 11) The Letter to the Philippians, 12) The Letter to the Colossians, 13) The 1st Letter to the Thessalonians, 14) The 2nd Letter to the Thessalonians, 15) The 1st Letter to Timothy, 16) The 2nd Letter to Timothy, 17) The Letter to Titus, 18) The Letter to Philemon, 19) The Letter to the Hebrews, 20) The Letter of James, 21) The 1st Letter of Peter, 22) The 2nd Letter of Peter 23) The 1st Letter of John, 24) The 2nd Letter of John, 25) The 3rd Letter of John, 26) The Letter of Jude, 27) The Book of Revelation.

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

– John 1:1

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– The New Testament in Brief –

A Brief Look at the Traditional Titles of the New Testament
1) The Gospel According to Matthew
2) The Gospel According to Mark
3) The Gospel According to Luke
4) The Gospel According to John
5) The Book of the Acts of the Apostles
6) The Letter to the Romans
7) The 1st Letter to the Corinthians
8) The 2nd Letter to the Corinthians
9) The Letter to the Galatians
10) The Letter to the Ephesians
11) The Letter to the Philippians
12) The Letter to the Colossians
13) The 1st Letter to the Thessalonians
14) The 2nd Letter to the Thessalonians
15) The 1st Letter to Timothy
16) The 2nd Letter to Timothy
17) The Letter to Titus
18) The Letter to Philemon
19) The Letter to the Hebrews
20) The Letter of James
21) The 1st Letter of Peter
22) The 2nd Letter of Peter
23) The 1st Letter of John
24) The 2nd Letter of John
25) The 3rd Letter of John
26) The Letter of Jude
27) The Book of Revelation

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A Brief Synopsis of the 8 Authors of the New Testament
1) Matthew: Gospel of Matthew
2) Mark: Gospel of Mark
3) Luke: Gospel of Luke, Book of Acts
4) John: Gospel of John, 1st Letter of John, 2nd Letter of John, 3rd Letter of John, Book of Revelation
5) James: Letter of James
6) Peter: 1st Letter of Peter, 2nd Letter of Peter
7) Jude: Letter of Jude
8) Paul: Letter to the Romans, 1st Letter to the Corinthians, 2nd Letter to the Corinthians, Letter to the Galatians, Letter to the Ephesians, Letter to the Philippians, Letter to the Colossians, 1st Letter to the Thessalonians, 2nd Letter to the Thessalonians, 1st Letter to Timothy, 2nd Letter to Timothy, Letter to Titus, Letter to Philemon

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A Brief Set of Facts about the New Testament
– The New Testament is a unique set of sacred writings, divided into 27 Books, that was added to the Old Testament almost 2,000 years ago to create the Holy Bible, the primary source document for the religion called Christianity.
– Every Known sect of Christianity, including the Protestant, Roman Catholic, and Eastern Orthodox Churches accept and recognize the same 27 Books as the official version of the New Testament.
– The Canon of the New Testament, consisting of the same 27 Books listed above, has remained unchanged for nearly 2,000 years. The first official lists of these books were published at the Council of Nicea and at the Council of Carthage.
– The 27 Books of the New Testament have exactly 4 Gospels, 2 Books, and 21 Letters.
– The 4 Gospels of the New Testament include: 1) The Gospel of Matthew, 2) The Gospel of Mark, 3) The Gospel of Luke, and 4) The Gospel of John.
– The 2 Books of the New Testament are commonly known as: 1) The Book of Acts and 2) The Book of Revelation.
– The 21 Letters of the New Testament can be listed as follows:  1) The Letter to the Romans, 2) The 1st Letter to the Corinthians, 3) The 2nd Letter to the Corinthians, 4) The Letter to the Galatians, 5) The Letter to the Ephesians, 6) The Letter to the Philippians, 7) The Letter to the Colossians, 8) The 1st Letter to the Thessalonians, 9) The 2nd Letter to the Thessalonians, 10 ) The 1st Letter to Timothy, 11) The 2nd Letter to Timothy, 12) The Letter to Titus, 13) The Letter to Philemon, 14) The Letter to the Hebrews, 15) The Letter of James, 16) The 1st Letter of Peter, 17) The  2nd Letter of Peter, 18) The 1st Letter of John, 19) The 2nd Letter of John, 20) The 3rd Letter of John, and 21) The Letter to Jude.
– The New Testament is believed to have been written in the years 45 – 90 A.D. Some scholars continue to dispute this, claiming that all, or some of the Books, were written much later.
– The 27 Books of the New Testament by 8 different authors whose actual names include the following: 1) Matthew, 2) Mark, 3) Luke, 4) John, 5) Paul, 6) Peter, 7) James, and 8) Jude.
– Luke, John, and Paul are credited with writing the vast majority of the New Testament, including 20 out of 27 total Books. To be specific, Luke is the author of 2 Books (1 Gospel, 1 Book). John wrote 5 Books (1 Gospel, 1 Book, and 3 Letters), while Paul is credited with 13 Books (13 Letters).
– The author who wrote the Letter to the Hebrews has remained anonymous and completely unknown for nearly the past 2,000 years

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A Brief Chronology for the 27 Books of the New Testament
1) Matthew, 2) Mark, 3) Luke, 4) John, 5) Acts, 6) Romans, 7) 1 Corinthians, 8) 2 Corinthians, 9) Galatians, 10) Ephesians, 11) Philippians, 12) Colossians, 13) 1 Thessalonians, 14) 2 Thessalonians, 15) 1 Timothy, 16) 2 Timothy, 17) Titus, 18) Philemon, 19) Hebrews, 20) James, 21) 1 Peter, 22) 2 Peter, 23) 1 John, 24) 2 John, 25) 3 John, 26) Jude,  27) Revelation

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A Brief Timeline for the Various Dates and Authors of the New Testament
45 A.D. – Letter of James (James)
50 A.D. – Gospel of Mark (Mark)
50 A.D. – Beginning of Paul’s 13 Letters (Paul)
55 A.D. – Gospel of Matthew (Matthew)
60 A.D. – Letter of Jude (Jude)
60 A.D. – 1st Letter of Peter, 2nd Peter (Peter)
60 A.D. – Gospel of Luke (Luke)
65 A.D. – Book of Acts (Luke)
65 A.D. – Letter to the Hebrews (Unknown)
70 A.D. – End of Paul’s 13 Letters (Paul)
90 A.D. – 1st Letter of John, 2nd John, 3rd John (John)
90 A.D. – Gospel of John (John)
90 A.D. – Book of Revelation (John)

NOTE: Paul’s 13 Letters include Romans, 1st Corinthians, 2nd Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1st Thessalonians, 2nd Thessalonians, 1st Timothy, 2nd Timothy, Titus, Philemon

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This shall be the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel; After those days, says the LORD. I will put my law in their inward parts, and write it in their hearts; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people.

– Jeremiah 31:33

– A Summary of the Books, Authors, and Dates of the New Testament –

For the most part, the 27 different Books of the Christian New Testament have remained exactly the same since the earliest centuries of Christianity. However, because of the lack of proper Church documentation during these times, most Biblical scholars and historians have tended to rely upon the written proclamations o the later Church Councils, most especially the Council of Nicea in 325 A.D. which was convened by the order of Emperor Constantine I, who later became the first Roman Emperor to ever convert to Christianity.

For many scholars and historians, surviving documents dating from the 4th century Christian Councils of Nicea (325 A.D.) and Carthage (397 A.D.) represent the first actual official statements concerning the Biblical Canon of the Christian faith, including the exact contents of both the Old and New Testament. In reality, the New Testament Canon of 27 different books had already been fully established within the early Church, and among most believers,  long before it ever became ‘official’ under the reign of Constantine, who assisted in the first official State recognition of Christianity and the Church. Before then, the Christian faith had undergone a series of persecutions which then slowly transformed into acceptance and eventual recognition

In terms of history, the reign of Emperor Constantine I represented a clear and decisive victory for the religion of Christianity. After centuries of state-sponsored oppression and animosity, the Christian Church finally achieved official recognition and legal status according to the Imperial laws of Rome. Most of this was due to Constantine I and his benevolent influence. In time, this inevitably led to a declaration calling for a general meeting of all the Christian bishops found throughout the Roman Empire. that was clearly intended to be ‘the first ecumenical conference of the early Christian Church.’ This initial push to better organize the Christian religion throughout the Empire culminated in the year 325 A.D. with what is now called the First Council of Nicea. One of the Council”s main achievements, which had historical ramifications for centuries to come, involved the creation of ‘the first uniform Christian doctrine, called the Nicene Creed.’

A Summary of the Council of Nicea (325 AD)  and the Synod of Carthage (397 AD)
Historically speaking, this same Council at Nicea also decided upon the final version of the Holy Bible including the total number of Books which were to be accepted as Scripture. In reality, the Church had already made their up their minds about the precise content of the Christian Bible. The Council of Nicea simply made things official. Even so, another general conference of Church leaders took place in 397 A.D. called the Synod of Carthage. One of their official Church decrees was deliberately intended as ‘an effort to protect the scriptures from various heresies and offshoot religious movements’. Thus, in order to prevent Scriptures from any future danger, the Council of Carthage held a special meeting on the 28th of August (397) where “the current 27 books of the New Testament were formally and finally confirmed and ‘canonized'” The Council of Carthage’s official list of accepted Biblical books, comprised of both the the Old and New Testament, reads as follows:

Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Josue, Judges, Ruth, 4 books of Kingdoms, 2 books of Paralipomenon, Job, Psalter of David, 5 books of Solomon, 12 books of Prophets, Isaias, Jeremias, Daniel, Ezechiel, Tobias, Judith, Esther, 2 books of Esdras, 2 books of Machabees, and in the New Testament: 4 books of Gospels, 1 book of Acts of the Apostles, 13 letters of the Apostle Paul, 1 of him to the Hebrews, 2 of Peter, 3 of John, 1 of James, 1 of Jude, and the Apocalypse of John.

– The Council of Carthage (397 A.D.)

Thus, it can be stated with all authority that the 27 different New Testament books, as they are still being used today, has been the only officially recognized text of Christianity for over 1,600 years. In other words, the every single Christian denomination since that time has remained in fundamental agreement over Scriptures, regardless of the any traditional Protestant/Catholic/Orthodox animosity. Put bluntly the New Testament, considered the fundamental sacred text of the religion of Christianity, has remained the same since the very beginning of the Church. Likewise, the Eastern Orthodox Church officially accepted the same 27 New Testament books in the year 367 A.D. and listed them in ‘the 39th Paschal Letter of Athanasius’.

Thus, the official names and  actual sequence of the 27 different books of the New Testament has been a key aspect of official Christian doctrine since the very beginning. Even so, the precise dates and actual authors of the various texts continue to remain a controversial issue even today, nearly 2,000 years later, and have yet to be settled to any great extent among a number of relevant scholars and experts in the field. Because of the strong, on-going differences in opinion about who really wrote the 27 books of the New Testament and when they were actually written, the following list of authors and dates should not be seen as any final statement or ultimate conclusion. Even so, the general Church consensus has, for several centuries now, tended to believe that the entire 27 books of the Christianity’s New Testament were written by eight specific men. They include:

The 8 Authors of the New Testament
1) St. Matthew
2) St. Mark
3) St. Luke
4) St. John
5) St. Paul
6) St. Peter
7) St. Jude
8) St. James

There is compelling evidence that this ‘8 men’ theory is, in fact, true. Nevertheless, certain compelling questions remain about  even though the simplicity of such a claim has caused numerous Biblical scholars to reject it as too simplistic of an explanation. To be fair to the skeptics and naysayers, there still remain serious discrepancies in some of the basic orthodox assumption about who really wrote at least some of the 27 official New Testament books of Christianity. Thus, the following list should be seen as a summary of what most Biblical scholars have concluded over the many centuries since the Councils of Nicea and Carthage finalized the New Testament Canon of the early Christian Church. So, even though debate still rages on about the precise dates and actual authors, the list below can still help to establish a general picture of who really wrote the 27 books of the New Testament along with the dates when they were written. As history has shown, the fierce debate about these particular issues have always been a crucial part of the Judeo-Christian tradition and will continue to be as time goes by.

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A List of the Authors and Dates of the New Testament

1. The Gospel of Matthew: by St. Matthew (55-90 A.D.)
2. The Gospel of Mark: by St. Mark, also known as John Mark (50-90 A.D.)
3. The Gospel of Luke: by St. Luke (60-90 A.D.)
4. The Gospel of John: by St. John, John the Elder (70-90 A.D.)
5. The Book of Acts: by St. Luke (65-90 A.D.)
6. The Letter to the Romans: by St. Paul (58 A.D.)
7. 1st Letter to the Corinthians: by St. Paul (54 A.D.)
8. 2nd Letter to the Corinthians: by St. Paul (55 A.D.)
9. Letter to the Galatians: by St. Paul (54 A.D.)
10. Letter to the Ephesians: by St. Paul (50-92 A.D.)
11. Letter to the Philippians: by St. Paul (50-65 A.D.)
12. Letter to the Colossians: by St. Paul (50-63 A.D.)
13. 1st Letter to the Thessalonians: by St. Paul (50-70 A.D.)
14. 2nd Letter to the Thessalonians: by St. Paul (50-70 A.D.)
15. 1st Letter to Timothy: by St. Paul (50-90 A.D.)
16. 2nd Letter to Timothy: by St. Paul (50-90 A.D.)
17. Letter to Titus: by St. Paul (50-70 A.D.)
18. Letter to Philemon: by St. Paul (50-70 A.D.)
19. Letter to the Hebrews: unknown, possibly by St. Paul, or Luke, Barnabas, or Apollo (60-90 A.D.)
20. Letter of James: by St. James (45-132 A.D.)
21. 1st Letter of Peter: by St. Peter (60-96 A,D,)
22. 2nd Letter of Peter: by St. Peter (60-150 A.D.)
23. 1st Letter of John: by St. John, John the Elder (90-110 A.D.)
24. 2nd Letter of John: by St. John, John the Elder (90-110 A.D.)
25. 3rd Letter of John: by St. John, John the Elder (90-110 A.D.)
26. Letter of Jude: by St. Jude (60-100 A.D.)
27. Book of Revelation: by St. John, John Mark, John the Elder (81-96 A.D.)

As stated previously, this list was never intended to be seen as the absolute authority on the subject of New Testament authors and dates. Instead, it was meant to provide a basic frame of reference for those who are relatively new to the subject. One should remember that the precise identity of any Biblical author has never been deemed that important to the overall understanding of Scriptures. This is why the continued mystery about who actually wrote the New Testament Letter to the Hebrews does not detract from the God-fearing words which have been left behind. More than one Old Testament book has also been written by yet another nameless, faceless source who is destined to remain anonymous, perhaps forever. Listed below are some of the more important aspects concerning the 27 books of the New Testament. They include the following:

Eight Key Aspects of the Judeo-Christian New Testament
I- In the 21st century, the New Testament is still considered to have exactly 27 Books. This has been the clear consensus among every known sect of Christianity since the earliest days of the Church.
II- In terms of exact numbers, the New Testament is a set of 27 separate books composed of around 7,959 verses made up of approximately 181,253 different words.
III- The oldest book of the New Testament is probably the book of James, written as early as 45 A.D. On the other hand, the Book of Revelation represents the youngest book of the New Testament, written about 95 A.D.
IV- Nearly the entire New Testament (90% or more) was written in Greek, although some scholars claim that at least ‘some may have been first written in Aramaic.’
V- The specific 27 books still found in today’s New Testament were officially canonized sometime around the year 375 A.D. After that, these same writings were then deemed by the leaders of the Church to be a distinctive part of what has been called the Word of God.
VI- From 367 A.D. onward, the Church’s final list of books for the New Testament clearly included the same 27 books that can be seen and studied using today’s Scriptures and are accepted by both modern Protestants and Catholic forms of Christianity. Even so, the highly apocalyptic Book of Revelation continued to be debated and disputed within the early Church hierarchy until almost 600 CE.
VII- Interestingly enough, the New Testament Canon decided to retain only four Gospels, out of some fifty other Gospels which were available throughout the first few centuries of Christianity.
VIII- Due to the inherent nature of Christianity, the Bible has inevitably become some of ‘the most disseminated books in the world,’ at least according to the New American Bible (Research Group). Some of the major factors underlying this global occurrence include: ‘St. Paul’s extensive evangelization to the Gentiles, the legalization of Christianity throughout the Roman Empire in 313, and the Bible’s first printing with movable type in 1455.’ Now, mainly due to the computer revolution which has occurred in the last decade or so, the continued promotion and inevitable ‘dissemination’ of the Bible appears to be the most likely outcome for the many decades which lie ahead.

In conclusion it must be stated that the Judeo-Christian Bible has proven itself to be a powerful source of inspiration which can affect others in a vast number of ways. This includes the more intelligent types of inspiration such as scholastic endeavor. academic excellence, and intellectual perfection. Thus, it should not come as much of a surprise to the many secular intellectuals of today to find highly intelligent men and women who still get very excited about the endless intellectual possibilities they have discovered through their continued study and renewed interest in Judeo-Christian Scriptures. One fairly enthusiastic source boldly claims that ‘the Holy Bible is the most influential and most popular book in history, it is first of all a religious book but also it is a work of literature, it is a work of history, it contains religious and secular laws, advice, poetry…It has been studied for thousands of years and yet much still remains to be known.’

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Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ.

– St. Jerome, 5th century Bible scholar

The Official Statistics of the New Testament
Number of books: 27
Chapters: 260
Verses: 7,957
Words: 180,552
Letters: 838,380
Middle book: 2 Thessalonians
Middle chapters: Romans 8, 9
Middle verse: Acts 27:17
Smallest book: 3 John
Shortest verse: John 11:35
Longest verse: Revelation 20:4
Longest chapter: Luke 1
Largest book: Luke

A Few Assorted New Testament Facts
– The New Testament has 4 Gospels, 2 Books, and 21 Epistles
– The 4 Gospels are: Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John
– The 2 Books are: Acts and Revelation
– The 21 Epistles are: Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, and Jude. III. The Book of Revelation
– In chronological order, the Christian New Testament (Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant) are as follows: Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Acts of Apostles, Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, Revelation
– The Peshitta edition of the New Testament excludes 2-3 John, 2 Peter, Jude, and Revelation, but Bibles of the modern Syriac Orthodox Church include later translations of those books along with the Letter of Baruch (sometimes included as part of 2 Baruch). Still today the official list followed by the Syrian Orthodox Church…presents lessons from only the twenty-two books of Peshitta.
– The 3rd Epistle to the Corinthians and the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs were once considered part of the Armenian Orthodox Bible, but are no longer printed with modern editions.
– The New Testament has different orders in the Slavonic, Ethiopian, Syriac and Armenian traditions. Protestant Bibles in Russia and Ethiopia also imitate the local Orthodox order for the New Testament.
– Four New Testament works were questioned or ‘spoken against’ by Martin Luther, and he changed the order of his New Testament to reflect this, but he did not leave them out, nor has any Lutheran authorities done so since that time. Traditional German ‘Luther Bibles’ are still printed with the New Testament in this changed ‘Luther Bible’ order.
– Many Evangelical Christian groups do not accept the theory that the Christian Bible was not known until various local and Ecumenical Councils, which they deem to be ‘Roman-dominated’, made their official declarations.
– The Evangelical Christians of today tend to believe that the New Testament supports that Paul (2 Timothy 4:11-13), Peter (2 Peter 3:15-16), and ultimately John (Revelation 22:18-19) finalized the canon of the New Testament.
– Some Christian researchers have taken careful note that Peter, John, and Paul wrote 20 (or 21) of the 27-books of the New Testament and personally knew all the other New Testament writers. The Books not attributed to these three men include: Matthew, Mark, Luke, Acts, James, and Jude. The authorship of Hebrews has long been disputed.)
– The New Testament includes the following statistics: Middle Book = 2 Thessalonians, Middle Chapter = Romans 8,9, Middle Verse = Acts 27:17, Largest Book = Luke, Smallest Book = 3 John, Longest Chapter = Luke 1, Shortest Verse = John 11:35
– The Book of Hebrews is the only anonymous letter in the New Testament, which is why it was placed at the end of Paul’s letters by the collectors of the Canon. The King James Version attributes this letter to Paul, but later versions don’t, as Paul doesn’t identify himself and there are other differences to his writings elsewhere.
– The shortest book in the New Testament is 3 John, with only 294 words in 14 verses. 2 John has 1 less verse but still has 4 more words.
– The four Gospels, according to tradition, were written by Matthew, Mark, Luke and john (the four evangelists); the Acts of the Apostles was probably written by the evangelist Luke, while most of the Letters or Epistles were written by Paul.
– There is one book of prophecy and it is Revelation, written by the apostle John
– Among confessions of faith drawn up by Protestants, several identify by name the 27-books of the New Testament canon, including the French Confession of Faith (1559), the Belgic Confession (1561), and the Westminster Confession of Faith (1647).
– The manuscript evidence for the New Testament is quite dramatic, with over 5,300 known copies and fragments in the original Greek still in existence today. Of these copies, nearly 800 of them were copied before 1000 AD. Some manuscript texts date to the early second and third centuries, with the time between the original autographs and our earliest existing copies being a remarkably short 60 years.
– Interestingly enough, this manuscript evidence far surpasses the manuscript reliability of other ancient writings that we trust as authentic every day. Here is a comparison chart:

CHRISTIANITY
The New Testament: 5,300 manuscripts remain, 800 of them dating from before 1,000 A.D.

PAGANISM
The Gallic Wars, by Julius Caesar: 10 manuscripts remain, with the earliest one dating to 1,000 years after the original autograph
History, by Pliny the Younger: 7 manuscripts written 750 years after the original
History, by Thucydides: 8 manuscripts written 1,300 years after the original
History, by Herodotus: 8 manuscripts written 1,300 years after the original
Sophocles: 193 manuscripts written 1,400 years after the original
Euripides: 9 manuscripts written 1,500 years after the original
Aristotle: 49 manuscripts written 1,400 years after the original

– In sum, there are still 5,300 Christian manuscripts Vs. 284 total Pagan manuscripts existing today. Yet still, the doubts and the skepticism is completely focused on the New Testament, rather than the Pagan alternative references to history and historical truth.
NewTestament-NewTestament-NewTestament-NewTestament-NewTestament-
XXVII. A Simple List of the 27 Titles, Authors, and Dates of the New Testament

+ The 27 Books, Authors, and Dates of the New Testament +

1) The Gospel of Matthew was written by the Apostle Matthew in the year 55 A.D.
2) The Gospel of Mark was written by the Disciple Mark in the year 50 A.D.
3) The Gospel of Luke was written by the Disciple Luke in the year 60 A.D.
4) The Gospel of John was written by the Disciple John in the year 90 A.D.
5) The Book of Acts was written by the Disciple Luke in the year 65 A.D.
6) The Letter to the Romans was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
7) The 1st Letter to the Corinthians was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
8) The 2nd Letter to the Corinthians was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
9) The Letter to the Galatians was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
10) The Letter to the Ephesians was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
11) The Letter to the Philippians was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
12) The Letter to the Colossians was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
13) The 1st Letter to the Thessalonians was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
14) The 2nd Letter to the Thessalonians was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
15) The 1st Letter to Timothy was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
16) The 2nd Letter to Timothy was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
17) The Letter to Titus was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
18) The Letter to Philemon was written by the Disciple Paul in the years 50-70 A.D.
19) The Letter to the Hebrews was written by an unknown author in the year 65 A.D.
20) The Letter of James was written by the Disciple James in the year 45 A.D.
21) The 1st Letter of Peter was written by the Apostle Peter in the year 60 A.D.
22) The 2nd Letter of Peter was written by the Apostle Peter in the year 60 A.D.
23) The 1st Letter of John was written by the Disciple John in the year 90 A.D.
24) The 2nd Letter of John was written by the Disciple John in the year 90 A.D.
25) The 3rd Letter of John was written by the Disciple John in the year 90 A.D.
26) The Letter of Jude was written by the Disciple Jude in the year 60 A.D.
27) The Book of Revelation was written by the Disciple John in the year 90 A.D.

May the LORD God bless you in the name of the Judeo-Christian tradition.

 

 

Defining the word ‘Judeo-Christian’
Before any serious discussion or analysis of the Judeo-Christian tradition can actually take place, one must first define the terms being utilized. The specific English word, ‘Judeo-Christian’ has only been in use since around the year 1899. Here are just a few definitions as can be found on-line today: 

 

 

 

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